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REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #1 
 Greetings

 I am a new member who has watched from a distance and lurked in the shadows much too long and I am now stumped.  It is time for me to ask for suggestions.

 

How would you improve a scorecard that measures performance?  In the attached chart the designer of the report is measuring on time performance in percentage ranges. 

In the attached example

=> Green is acceptable, no action required by the account manager
=> Yellow means we should contact the carrier and let them know their performance is slipping - Soft (verbal) warning 
=> Red means the carrier's performance is unacceptable and they are possibly going to lose our business unless they improve.  The account manager will contact the carrier and put them on follow up warning and request a Root Cause Analysis and corrective action be completed by the carrier.

 

As mentioned in on of Steve's articles Red, Yellow, Green can have different meanings to different people and can be lost to those who are colorblind.  I see this scorecard used many times throughout the company (for many different metrics) and would like a solution that is more contemporary and easier to read. 

 

It is time for me to “take the lead” and provide something fresh.

 

Thanks for anything you can provide.

Roland


Scorecard_Sample.png 

 


danz

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Posts: 186
Reply with quote  #2 
REB01,

The most important thing is the sorting criteria. If the percentage is the most important, then sort just by percentage, remove the colors and use two level alert signs.

I can only assume that the following can do a better job in some circumstances.
Sorting criteria is Alert level and Total Shipments. The second sorting criteria allows the account manager to decide to take actions based not only on alert level (mandatory) but also on importance of the carrier (based on amount of shipments).

4.png 




REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks danz, interesting design.  I will give that a try and see "how it flies" to the managers.  It will be interesting to hear their comments and maybe that will trigger some discussion about other alternatives.  I will also discuss it with my reporting teammates to solicit some fresh ideas.

As far as the sort on my example, it is sorted many different ways when distributed and often by Red first, then yellow followed by green on the bottom much like you have it.  What you see is the raw output without the sort to enable creative thinking by the forum members.  :-)  I did not want to "force" anyone into thinking they had to sort it any particular way.

Thanks, however, for pointing that out because sort order is important.

Roland
jlbriggs

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Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #4 
The first thing that I would certainly do is get rid of the red/yellow/green.

Not only are the issues of the colors having various meanings, and the issue of color blindess, but there is also what I consider the golden rule of design, of any kind:

If everything is highlighted, nothing is highlighted!

All of those colored cells on the page just make a mess of the page, and highlight every carrier, whether they need attention or not.
Color can still be used, but it should be used more sparingly, and more subtly.  Stephen advocates a small red disc shape, that rather than varying on color, varies in intensity. 

I like Danz's example, but there are a couple of things that I would change:

1)  I would replace the x and o icons with the red circle mentioned above, with 2 levels of staturation (or more, if desired)

2) I would change the bars to encode the percentage directly. I feel it adds confusion if the counts are encoded instead - if the percentage is the key measure, it is what should be displayed in the bars.

Another column, with a smaller scale, that encodes the number of shipments could be added, directly to the right of the number of shipments numeric column (and another such small bar column far the 'on time' column).

The number of shipments is obviously a factor, but the ontime % appears to be that focus here.

I track the same data myself, and the other thing that I do is to compare the overall ontime % with the latest deliveries.

I keep the historic data, and plot a sparkline of performance for each carrier, with each point being the average ontime % of the previous 5 deliveries.
I then use the ontime % of the last 5 deliveries as a comparative measure against the overall for that carrier.

Overall average for all carriers may be a useful measure as well, making the bars into bullet graphs instead.


REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #5 

jlbriggs

Thank you for your suggestions.  I am having difficulty getting a chart connected to my table because the software we are currently using is giving me fits!  But I agree that the percentage is probably a better metric to display and am still trying to do exactly that.

Anyway... thanks again for your suggestions, if you would post some examples of your work that would be great. I am having difficulty imagining what you are doing. 

I will certainly begin a timeline once I get a good handle on what is happening in the business.  I think I may limit it to a top "N"; we have hundreds of carriers in our stable because we are a 3rd Party Logistics provider.

Roland

PS
the goal numbers are *not* realistic, only put there for examples. Our real numbers for the carries are much more stringent. :)

danz

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Posts: 186
Reply with quote  #6 
Roland,

I agree with jlbriggs suggestion of thinking about possible bullet instead of simple bars for percentage, two chart columns instead of one (encoding the percentage and the shipments), also possible sparklines (can be win-loss, bars or lines) and to focus for alerts on a recent period of time or last few shipments. 

My first quick design before my first post was the following:

5.png 

This had 2 levels of warning colors, but also 2 different alert signs and separators for colorblind people. Of course, some redundancy was obvious, but wasn't that heavy. You could also remove the blue color and use a shade of gray, but this wasn't relevant for me. Notice that I considered the percentage of delayed shipments instead of on time, which allows a larger bar for the most negative situation. 

But then I also assumed you may have more carriers to look for, so might be that the importance of carrier (amount of shipments for instance) has a higher relevance in the already established alert level group then the percentage itself. This is why I said that in some circumstances my previous design can actually work, encoding shipments and percentage in just one column and sorting on two criteria alert level and carrier relevance. 

However, if you already filter out the carriers based on a relevance criteria, then only simple sorting on percentage, as above, should be just enough. I would only suggest that instead of filtering out based on relevance criteria, to use groups of relevance, or pages or different sheets, whatever your application can provide. Below an example based on an arbitrary value used for relevance (200+ shipments)    

1. First Group
6.png   

2. Second Group 
7.png 


Daniel



REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #7 
Daniel -

Well done, in my opinion.  Thank you for the clarification.  I shall continue working on our solution.

Thanks again.

Roland
REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #8 
I had been pulled off my "side project" to enhance/improve our report but had a little time this week to work on it.

This is what I have come up with for now.  Our current reporting tool is somewhat limited in respect to adding graphs so I took the suggestions provided, modified them slightly, and this is what I think we will use until we can add some decent graphs.

Red- the carrier is in trouble
Pale Yellow - not as good as they should be
White (no color highlight) no action required.

Sorted by alert level - Red being the most critical, then within the colors sorted in descending order by number of shipments.  This floats the carriers with the most activity to the top in each category. 

It has gained acceptance in the organization and is at least better than what they had previously.  It is not perfect, but I think we are on the right track.

Thoughts?

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danz

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Posts: 186
Reply with quote  #9 
Roland,

I'm glad your audience agrees with this sorting/grouping criteria. My first guess was quite close to your solution, except the extra graphics. One question, is that percentage precision necessary?  
REB01

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Posts: 7
Reply with quote  #10 
No, that precision is not necessary. In fact, in the final (official) version I removed the decimal.  Finally, something I can live with. :)
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