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jhcarrell

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #31 
I've been out of the loop on this thread, but was pleased to see you've made several incremental improvements on your original design.

That being said, one thing that jumped out to me (besides being redundant) was in regard to the line graph/table ... there are categorical labels that have been cut off in both the legend and the table itself.  (Some of them significantly)  This can lead to confusion and unnecessary questions as to what each series of data represents.

Example1.PNG 

Clarity is of the utmost importance.  If the user is unsure of what is being represented in the graph, what's the point of the graph to begin with?

Best wishes,

Jonathon


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"In the realm of data visualization, we face many challenges that are worth pursuing. Creating an effective radial gauge is not one of them. It is a fool’s errand. Do I strike you as a fool?" - Stephen Few
jrodriguez

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #32 
So after several rounds of feedback, testing and some new tricks I learned from Steve, the dashboard has evolved into this. Basically a complete redesign.  It now fits all in one single page, and what is important (Mainly red items) should jump at you a bit more. They only become red when there is a problem.

I fought to keep the direct labels off, but most people wanted them on even though it doesn't look as clean as it could. I also used as little color as I could without making it seem 'boring' or busy on the eyes. Each color has a meaning too.... for example, red needs attention, blue is something nearing a closing date, and yellow is always current year on the line graph.

Let me know if you guys see any potential improvements I could add. So far I have persuaded the team to not use a gauge or funnel chart, that was a win!

Joe


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danz

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Posts: 190
Reply with quote  #33 
It looks nice, they are several good ideas. Still a few things can be improved.

1. Number alignment to the right in tables/lists.
2. Unit of measure, $ (or any other), is enough to appear only once in the scales.
3. I would avoid designing value numbers in top of the bars. If the value labels are a must, make a table like design for label, right aligned value and the associated bar.
4. For the charts with target comparison, I assume the gray area of the bars is for the whole year projected value and the target to compare with is for the whole year. I would display in one screen ytd value and ytd target. In case yearly target is provided, calculate the ytd target and display that (if you are able to calculate projected value, then you are also able to calculate the ytd target). You can design in a different screen graphs for whole year projected values versus yearly target.
5. Try one letter months abbreviations and remove the ticks.
6. Any special reasons for the colors of the right charts bars?
jrodriguez

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #34 
Good stuff Danz, I made the changes, thanks.

on #5...Im split on this one. I've tried this before and I get the impression people have to think twice or double check what month they are looking at when they see the letter, vs the 3 letter abbrev. which is instant. I mean, we're talking fractions of a second here, but still. Just my gut feel, not sure. 

on #6. This is me selling out to a color hungry crowd. But, the blue symbolizes items getting really close to their closing dates. I actually have a popup in the top right corner with some explanation behind the colors. At least compared to my earlier versions, all colors mean something here, even if they are too abundant.
bella_gotie

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Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #35 
Try to remove borders & $
borders.png 

jlbriggs

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Posts: 194
Reply with quote  #36 
@jrodriguez - I pretty much agree with @danz's points, especially the issues of right-aligning numbers in a table, and moving the data labels outside, to the right of the charts instead of at the end of the bar.

But I have to say, you've done a great job with this. You started the post with something that was obviously an improvement over your company's current state, and have taken it miles beyond what you started with now. Great work incorporating feedback and taking criticism.

If were going to offer any further suggestions, the only other minor thing I see that I would alter is to make the row of numbers at the top right bold, just to give them slightly more focus than they currently have



danz

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Posts: 190
Reply with quote  #37 
Well said @jlbriggs:

"...you've done a great job with this. You started the post with something that was obviously an improvement over your company's current state, and have taken it miles beyond what you started with now. Great work incorporating feedback and taking criticism..."

@jrodriguez, I am sure your effort will be properly valued there, keep up the good work.
sfew

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Posts: 827
Reply with quote  #38 
Joe,

I haven't had a chance to review your new version thoroughly, but one potential improvement jumped out at me. You are coloring the bars red to highlight them. I avoid this practice because it tends to feature small problems more than large problems. In your case, low values are the problem--correct? The lower the value, the shorter the bars--correct? As a consequence, which values will stand out the most by changing their color to red? The answer: the highest values (i.e., longest bars). A tiny value would represent a huge problem, but coloring it red might not emphasize it at all. Rather than color-coding the data objects (e.g., bars) themselves to highlight items, I cause a unique icon to appear next to them. In many of my dashboards you will see small circle icons, usually colored red, that serve as alerts. The purpose of the icon is simply to say, "Look at this." The purpose of the icon is not to assign different levels of alert to items, although this could be done using different color intensities, but to merely say, "This potentially needs attention."

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jrodriguez

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #39 
Hey guys,

My dashboard OCD continues to drive improvement here. You will notice most of the feedback you guys provided is now reflected here, including yours Steve (Sorry, I missed your last post). For the bullet graphs, I opted to move away from the red mainly because it would take a few months for people to move those bars (Long sales cycles). By simply looking at the graph, you know what the deal is so there is no sense in aggravating the user by adding the dreaded red (They now take red very seriously here!).

A few other improvements:

  • Use of color has been streamlined further and the color red now represents something you can and should act on immediately.
  • Dollars signs are gone and all represented in 000's. I only left them on the top right due to a few misunderstandings that occurred.
  • I personalized things a bit. Now you get a greeting on the top left (This became their landing page by demand). Also, the tooltips will have certain quotes based on individual performance and time in the year. These are mostly goofy and funny quotes to keep things as fun as possible (Pic Attached).
  • I added an instant feedback button. So when you click on the envelope on top right, you get a quick popup survey page (Pic Attached).

Thanks again for the feedback guys. Let me know if I can help you in any way.

Joe CRM Home.PNG



  Tooltip.PNG 




Feedback.PNG 

sfew

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Posts: 827
Reply with quote  #40 
Joe,

Based on a quick review, here are a few suggestions and questions:

  1. Why are you using the color blue in some cases to represent values but shades of gray elsewhere? Why not use a consistent color scheme (i.e., either shades of blue or shades of gray in all cases)?
  2. The vertical black target lines that appear in several of the graphs are some of the most visually salient objects, but they don't deserve to be. Targets are are not the values that should be featured.
  3. Placing numbers in the plot are of graphs (e.g., to the right of bars) is almost never a good practice. If precise values are needed, place the number to the left of the bars and right-align them in a column so they can be easily read and compared.
  4. The tick marks along the X axes of your line graphs aren't needed.
  5. Your pipeline values lack context in the form of comparisons. Perhaps you could add a measure of the norm, such as by adding a vertical reference line to indicate the value that is typical (e.g., the mean).
  6. Showing YTD values versus a target for the year is of little use for most of the year. Until you get well into the year, actual YTD values will always be well below the target such that showing the target value reveals almost nothing.
  7. YTD values are of little value for performance monitoring. To effect performance, you must track what's going on during smaller ranges of time. For example, actual sales during the current month versus a target for the month and compared to how well you did during the same month last year.
  8. Don't ask people for feedback regarding the "Visual Appeal" of an information display unless they are skilled designers. Visual appeal has no bearing on visual effectiveness.
  9. "Goofy or funny quotes to keep things as fun as possible"? Seriously? Perhaps you should provide cute pictures of kittens.

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Stephen Few
jrodriguez

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Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #41 
1. I'm with you on this. I keep trying to appease a color hungry crowd. My leverage to enact changes has grown significantly though and they'll wake up one day soon with those gray bars being blue like the rest. 

2. Awesome point that I just now noticed. Done.

3. I got resistance a while back on this, but will force this one through. I agree.

4. Done

5. True...we're working on implementing a historical log to add that context and know what's the norm. Right now, these pipeline metrics are point in time. They serve as a heads up to follow up or update opportunities closing soon more than anything else.

6. I can't shake this one, but don't disagree. Not a lot of value for daily users, but leadership likes it as it provides a quick snapshot of how each team is doing vs target each time they log on. This little guy defeated the salesforce.com speed gauge graph with red, yellow and green on it by the way! One battle at a time.

7.This is a tricky one. I see your point if we were selling something like commodity items, but we sell systems with lead times ranging 1 to 12+ months. I'm also addressing a few audiences, from daily users to mid and high level managers. Maybe a quarterly view could be useful? The performance metric I push the most here is opps created. Its pretty safe to say that if a team does not generate more opportunities than they did last year, they can't expect much growth...unless they bring Terminator to come close more of the deals they get. This is one that we can execute on a monthly basis and see quicker results.

8. Ok...I think I was just being extra nice with that one.

9. Oh common Steve! That's why its on the very bottom of the tooltip and with very light font. I do think there's a place for kittens somewhere on this dashboard though....I'll figure that one later. 🐱🐱🐱

Thanks. Always humbled by your feedback.

Joe
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